Having acquired a dog just over a week ago, I am spending a lot of time walking around in what could easily be described as “The Countryside”. I have always loved animals and wildlife, and the chances are that I will die in a car crash having lost control as I became distracted by a heron flying overhead, but it seems to have been a long time since I actually got out into nature and saw wildlife up close. Over the weekend I have seen numerous common birds – including a wren which, in spite of its large distribution, I had never spotted before – a pheasant which was actually alive rather than dead at the side of the road, a fox and – most impressive at all – a buzzard take off from a tree not twenty feet in front of me. Initially, when thinking back, I was disappointed that I had not got photographs of these moments, but the more I thought about it, the more I consider that to be a good thing: The reason I didn’t take a photo was because it didn’t occur to me to; I was in the moment, enjoying the experience. It seems to me that the minute we start to film or photograph a moment then we take ourselves out of that moment and are thinking about how we or other people will view it in the future. It has always seemed strange to me when people watch a gig through the screen of their phone, held above the heads of the crowd by outstretched arms, a distillation of an immediate experience. Are our memories really so bad these days that we would rather experience half the emotional impact of something in order to preserve a copy of it, or are we so concerned with receiving hits and up-votes and showing people how much of a good time we had that we are actually willing to compromise on the good time? The fact that Daniel Kitson barely tours and doesn’t release any material is somewhat frustrating as I want to be able to show other people just how amazing he is, but actually the scarcity of Kitson consumption means that I truly appreciate it when I do see him, and the enjoyment and legend of it only builds in my mind and memory, rather than being dulled and oversaturated by being able to see him any time I want. Familiarity breeds contempt, scarcity creates magic and intrigue.

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One thought on “Having acquired a dog just over a week ago, I am spending a lot of time walking around in what could easily be described as “The Countryside”. I have always loved animals and wildlife, and the chances are that I will die in a car crash having lost control as I became distracted by a heron flying overhead, but it seems to have been a long time since I actually got out into nature and saw wildlife up close. Over the weekend I have seen numerous common birds – including a wren which, in spite of its large distribution, I had never spotted before – a pheasant which was actually alive rather than dead at the side of the road, a fox and – most impressive at all – a buzzard take off from a tree not twenty feet in front of me. Initially, when thinking back, I was disappointed that I had not got photographs of these moments, but the more I thought about it, the more I consider that to be a good thing: The reason I didn’t take a photo was because it didn’t occur to me to; I was in the moment, enjoying the experience. It seems to me that the minute we start to film or photograph a moment then we take ourselves out of that moment and are thinking about how we or other people will view it in the future. It has always seemed strange to me when people watch a gig through the screen of their phone, held above the heads of the crowd by outstretched arms, a distillation of an immediate experience. Are our memories really so bad these days that we would rather experience half the emotional impact of something in order to preserve a copy of it, or are we so concerned with receiving hits and up-votes and showing people how much of a good time we had that we are actually willing to compromise on the good time? The fact that Daniel Kitson barely tours and doesn’t release any material is somewhat frustrating as I want to be able to show other people just how amazing he is, but actually the scarcity of Kitson consumption means that I truly appreciate it when I do see him, and the enjoyment and legend of it only builds in my mind and memory, rather than being dulled and oversaturated by being able to see him any time I want. Familiarity breeds contempt, scarcity creates magic and intrigue.

  1. Some fascinating points in regards to ‘Mania’ however you seem to have to forgotten our jaw dropping moment when the Undertaker lost the streak! Now that was a shocker!

    Like

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